©2017 BY MINDFULNESS IN MOTION, London UK

Alexander Technique and Disabilities

 Through teaching the Alexander Technique I help people with disabilities can benefit and achieve an easier use of the body through movement. By respecting and acknowledging the limits in a person's motion, the purpose is to help the pupil be in good terms with themselves as whole.

 Having frequent Alexander Technique lessons can speed up the recovery process after an injury and can work well alongside physiotherapy sessions.

In the case of disabilities the way is to meet the anatomical situation as it is and through the acceptance of its uniqueness give the mind and the body the time and space to breathe and release.

 Depending on the condition, different movement games are practiced, and with the Teacher's help, the pupil can have a new experience of their own weight and use of gravity. Though the process of the lesson new connections develop that create new neurological pathways and open new possibilities of sensory appreciation.

 

 

The Alexander Technique has been greatly recognised for the improvement it can bring about in people suffering from Parkinson’s disease. For detailed studies on the effects of the Alexander Technique in Parkinson's see Here.

People with disabilities can also benefit and achieve an easier use of the body through movement. By respecting and acknowledging the limits in a person's motion, the purpose is to help the pupil be in good terms with themselves as whole. In the case of disabilities the way is to meet the anatomical situation as it is and through the acceptance of its uniqueness give the mind and the body the time and space to breathe and release.

Depending on the condition, different movement games are practiced, and with the Teacher's help, the pupil can have a new experience of their own weight and use of gravity. Though the process of the lesson new connections develop that create new neurological pathways and open new possibilities of sensory appreciation.

 The updated NICE guidelines contain the following statement in the section called 'Non-pharmacological management of motor and non-motor symptoms':

'1.7.4 Consider the Alexander Technique for people with Parkinson's disease who are experiencing balance or motor function problems.'

To see the new guidelines, 'Parkinson's disease in adults' visit: www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ng71