©2017 BY MINDFULNESS IN MOTION, London UK

SCIENTIFIC EVIDENCE

Nikolaas Tinbergen Nobel Prize Speech on Alexander Technique  

Nikolaas Tinbergen, awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine "for their discoveries concerning organization and elicitation of individual and social behaviour patterns". He devoted a significant portion of his Nobel prize lecture in 1973 to talking about F. M. Alexander, the Alexander Technique, and the importance of Alexander's discoveries and the benefits he and his wife experienced from lessons.  

Contact me   to book an Alexander Technique session or with any questions you have about your situation. Start experiencing the benefits for yourself ... 

ATLAS - Neck Pain Trial at the University of York  - comparing Alexander Technique, acupuncture & GP care  - research results due 2015 

A large randomised clinical trial involving 517 participants is investigating how effective Alexander Technique lessons are, compared with acupunture and usual GP care, for people with chronic neck pain. The 3-year trial, which began in October 2011, is being conducted by the University of York and is funded to the tune of £720,000 by Arthritis Research UK.  

 

In this trial, people with chronic neck pain have been randomised to one of three groups: 

Alexander Technique lessons from STAT-registered teachers (total time 600 minutes across 20 lessons), with continued GP care 

acupuncture sessions (total time 600 minutes across 12 sessions), with continued GP care 

continued GP care alone 

 

Pain and disability associated with neck pain will be assessed over 1 year, along with measures of quality of life, participant beliefs and experience, cost effectiveness and safety. The trial is not designed to be a direct comparison of Alexander lessons and acupuncture, rather it will compare each of these with usual GP care. Further details can be found in the published trial protocol 2

 

Patient interviews 

Some patients have taken part in in-depth interviews on their perceptions and experiences of Alexander Technique sessions, acupuncture and usual GP care. The researchers are also exploring patients' preferences, beliefs and understanding of their neck pain and the impact these factors might have on their experience of treatment and the subsequent outcome. 

 

The results will provide robust evidence on whether there are: significant worthwhile benefits to patients; economic benefits demonstrating value for money; and sufficient levels of acceptability and safety. 

 

Chronic neck pain is a common condition in the adult population. As well as being painful and disabling, it is associated with significant costs to the individual, their families, the NHS and society in general. As the optimal care for chronic neck pain has not yet been established and with patients commonly self referring for acupuncture and Alexander Technique sessions as treatment options, more research on the effectiveness of these interventions is needed. 

British Medical Journal (BMJ) Study on Alexander Technique  - Significant Benefits for Back Pain Patients 

 Impressive long-term benefit from Alexander Technique lessons for low back pain has been demonstrated by a major study published by the British Medical Journal on 20th August 2008. 

Compared with usual GP care, trial participants who undertook 24 Alexander Technique lessons with a registered teacher, experienced significantly: 

- less pain (average 3 days of pain per month versus 21 days) 

- less incapacity (able to carry out three more types of daily tasks without being limited by back pain) 

Trial participants who undertook 6 lessons had an average of 10 days of pain per month versus 21 days for the control group. 

Alexander Technique Improves Postural Tone  

Scientific findings indicate the Alexander Technique changes how anti-gravity muscle tension is regulated and that it reduces stiffness along the spine and hips. 

Find the paper: "Increased dynamic regulation of postural tone through Alexander Technique training". by T.W.Cacciatore, V.S. Gurfinkel, F.B. Horak, P.J. Cordo, and K.E. Ames, study published in Human Movement Science - Feb 2011. 

Picture to right shows Claire Rennie taking part in Alexander Technique research conducted by Dr. Tim Cacciatore 

NHS Choices

Since the beginning of the 20th century there has been enough scientific evidence to support the effects of the Alexander Technique in the improvement of Neck and Lower Back pain, Parkinson’s disease and many other ailments.nce the beginning of the 20th century there has been enouSince the beginning of the 20th century there has been enough scientific evidence to support the effects of the Alexander Technique in the improvement of Neck and Lower Back pain, Parkinson’s disease and many other ailments.gh scientific evidence to support the effects of the Alexander Technique in the improvement of Neck and Lower Back pain, Parkinson’s disease and many other ailments.the beginning of the 20th century there has been enough scientific evidence to support the effects of the Alexander Technique in the improvement of Neck and Lower Back pain, Parkinson’s disease and many other ailments.

Since the beginning of the 20th century there has been enough scientific evidence to support the effects of the Alexander Technique in the improvement of Neck and Lower Back pain, Parkinson’s disease and many other ailments.

NHS Clinical Trials

Proactive Selective Inhibition Targeted at the Neck Muscles

Article by 

Ian D. Loram, Member, IEEE, Brian Bate, Pete Harding, Ryan Cunningham, Member, IEEE,

and Alison Loram

'Proactive Selective Inhibition Targeted at
the Neck Muscles: This Proximal Constraint
Facilitates Learning and Regulates GlobalControl'

Research

Effect of tai chi versus aerobic exercise for fibromyalgia: comparative effectiveness randomized controlled trial

Tai chi mind-body treatment results in similar or greater improvement in symptoms than aerobic exercise, the current most commonly prescribed non-drug treatment, for a variety of outcomes for patients with fibromyalgia. Longer duration of tai chi showed greater improvement. This mind-body approach may be considered a therapeutic option in the multidisciplinary management of fibromyalgia.

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